Morticianguide

License Requirements

Mortician State License Requirements

Every state has different requirements for obtaining a funeral director or embalmer license. Generally speaking, requirements include one or two year programs at any of the accredited mortuary science schools, followed by a one or two year internship, and passing a national exam. While it is only necessary to get one license, most students obtain both licenses as it greatly increases their employment opportunities. If you choose to get an embalmer’s license, some states require you to perform a minimum number of embalmings before granting you a state license. If you decide to relocate to a different state, there are reciprocity guidelines in each state that outline whether or not you can transfer your license over to the state you are moving to without doing additional work. Generally speaking, if you move to a state with less stringent licensing requirements, there is no need to do additional work to get re-licensed in another state. Also, in order to maintain your license, morticians are often required to take continuing education courses every year.

Analyzing the Data

The table below only gives a very rough approximation of the license requirements for every state. There are long documents produced by each state that go through the finer details. While it is better to go through these details yourself and with the director of the mortician school you want to attend, this data serves as a good starting point. Since the state distinguishes between funeral director and embalmer license, we took the maximum years of school required in order to simplify the results and to make it look presentable in one table. Please choose your state on the menu on the left sidebar to get more detailed information regarding your particular state. All in all, the table below serves as a good template for roughly estimating the licensing requirements in any given state. Once you figure out what state you would like to eventually work in, we highly recommend you comb through the finer details yourself by visiting the website of your state’s licensing board